So, this is the second of my ‘round up of restaurant foods I ate and then forgot to add to my list because I reviewed them some other place’ posts. This one is based on foods I ate when I went on a mini trip to Stratford-upon-Avon for ‘work’ (it was awesome). 

880. Knickerbocker Glory

Knickerbocker Glory was my favourite dessert as a small child. I would order it whenever we went to a pub or a restaurant for a meal. I think it’s a British thing, so for the benefit of everyone else, it’s an ice cream sundae, served in a tall glass, and it’s always made of vanilla ice cream, fruit, fruit syrup, and whipped cream. The classic one is made with canned mixed fruits, but this one was a little fancier and had fresh raspberries in it. It also had popping candy on the top. It was pretty fantastic.

881. Foie Gras and 882. Green Tomato

Pie’s starter was a foie gras terrine with green tomato chutney. I’d never had foie gras before. I’m not really comfortable with the idea of how it’s made, so it’s something I would generally avoid, but I thought for the purpose of the list it was something I should try once. Really I found it was too much for me. It was so rich it felt like I was more or less eating a big mouthful of butter. On top of that, I’ve never been a fan of anything like pate so I don’t think I was ever a prime candidate for trying it. It was interesting to try once, but I won’t be in a rush to have it again. The green tomato chutney on the other hand was lovely though. I’m not always a big chutney person, but this was delicious and the green tomatoes were full of flavour.

883. Baked Alaska

Baked Alaska seemed like a magic dessert when I was a kid. Ice cream that is hot but not all melted? Amazing. I used to like making it with Jamaica ginger cake. Yum. This was just the classic though - vanilla sponge, jam, vanilla ice cream, and meringue.

883 down, 913 to go

You know when you go to a restaurant and you come home and you write a review of it, and then you completely forget to actually add the list foods you ate to your list… No? Just me? Well, in any case, that’s what I managed to do, so this post and the next one will be a little round up of all those foods I ate out and then never wrote up. These are from two different visits to what clearly must be my favourite restaurant, Miller & Carter. 

876. Chateaubriand

I shared this monster steak on one visit. It’s a double-sized fillet, and there’s really nothing bad you can say about a nice big chunk of delicious meat.

877. Surf and Turf and 878. Lobster Thermidor

On yet another visit to Miller & Carter, I went for the Surf & Turf, which was paired a steak with a small Lobster Thermidor and a king prawn skewer. Honestly I’m not convinced about having both together. Steak is awesome. Lobster is awesome. But I know that I at least will always be in the mood for either lots of meat, or be in the mood for fish, but never both, together, at the same time. I’d rather just pick one or the other and enjoy the single pleasure of a big hunk of steak or a juicy buttery lobster all by itself. 

879. Baked Cheesecake

I love cheesecake. I love cheesecake of every flavour. I love cheesecake for dessert, or for a snack, or for breakfast (ok, I probably have never eaten it for breakfast, but I would). Sometimes I feel like plain baked cheesecake is the poor man’s choice when there are so many other delicious kinds of cheesecake out there (I’m looking at you Cheesecake Factory Kahlua Cocoa Coffee), but then I have it, and I remember how awesome plain baked cheesecake is too. It’s creamy, and sweet, but not too sweet, and it has the soft cheese with the crunchy base, and oh my god, how much do I want cheesecake now?! Cheesecake.

879 down, 917 to go

875. Lussekatter
This seems to have become a baked goods and citrus blog. I’m not sorry. Lussekatter are a traditional Swedish Christmas bun, flavoured with saffron and with raisins. Sweden is obsessed with saffron at Christmas; it seems to get put in everything (mostly just buns, but I like to eat a lot of buns). It’s not a flavour I would have ever associated with Christmas before but it’s a very nice one. 
875 down, 921 to go

875. Lussekatter

This seems to have become a baked goods and citrus blog. I’m not sorry. Lussekatter are a traditional Swedish Christmas bun, flavoured with saffron and with raisins. Sweden is obsessed with saffron at Christmas; it seems to get put in everything (mostly just buns, but I like to eat a lot of buns). It’s not a flavour I would have ever associated with Christmas before but it’s a very nice one. 

875 down, 921 to go

873. Meyer Lemons and 874. Dried Fruit in Chocolate
The first two years of my blog, Christmas was a time that I was able to tick so many things off of the list, but it is getting to the point now where I have eaten almost all the Christmassy foods that there are to eat! Back in my hometown this year, I did manage to eat two things though. Firstly, I picked up these meyer lemons when I went to the supermarket with my dad. They’re one of those foods I’ve heard a lot about, but had never seen in the UK to try before now. I tried them by themselves (delicious), in a gin and tonic (even more delicious), and in cups of tea (slightly odd compared to a regular lemon but by no means bad). 
Over Christmas I also indulged in some delicious dried fruits in chocolate at my mum’s house, but the picture I took seems to have sadly eluded me. I blame my phone. It must be the technology’s fault right? Anyway, there were apricots coated in milk chocolate and apricots coated in white chocolate and chocolate raisins and cherries coated in dark chocolate and the whole affair was delicious and I could easily have sat and eaten the whole box myself.
874 down, 922 to go

873. Meyer Lemons and 874. Dried Fruit in Chocolate

The first two years of my blog, Christmas was a time that I was able to tick so many things off of the list, but it is getting to the point now where I have eaten almost all the Christmassy foods that there are to eat! Back in my hometown this year, I did manage to eat two things though. Firstly, I picked up these meyer lemons when I went to the supermarket with my dad. They’re one of those foods I’ve heard a lot about, but had never seen in the UK to try before now. I tried them by themselves (delicious), in a gin and tonic (even more delicious), and in cups of tea (slightly odd compared to a regular lemon but by no means bad). 

Over Christmas I also indulged in some delicious dried fruits in chocolate at my mum’s house, but the picture I took seems to have sadly eluded me. I blame my phone. It must be the technology’s fault right? Anyway, there were apricots coated in milk chocolate and apricots coated in white chocolate and chocolate raisins and cherries coated in dark chocolate and the whole affair was delicious and I could easily have sat and eaten the whole box myself.

874 down, 922 to go

871. Kavring and 872. Limpa
These are two kinds of Swedish breads which I’ve tried over the last few weeks. Kavring is in the picture, and it is a rye bread with a slightly sweet flavour, and a similar texture to regular wholemeal. Limpa is a whiter bread, though still made with a little rye flour, and I used it to make some kickass grilled cheese and ham sandwiches (which were unfortunately unphotographed, because, well, they just looked too tasty to wait). Since being in Sweden, we have been pretty blown away by the quality of the baked goods, and these have shown that even regular sliced bread from the supermarket is great here!
872 down, 924 to go

871. Kavring and 872. Limpa

These are two kinds of Swedish breads which I’ve tried over the last few weeks. Kavring is in the picture, and it is a rye bread with a slightly sweet flavour, and a similar texture to regular wholemeal. Limpa is a whiter bread, though still made with a little rye flour, and I used it to make some kickass grilled cheese and ham sandwiches (which were unfortunately unphotographed, because, well, they just looked too tasty to wait). Since being in Sweden, we have been pretty blown away by the quality of the baked goods, and these have shown that even regular sliced bread from the supermarket is great here!

872 down, 924 to go

870. Sea Buckthorn
Since Christmas, I’ve been trying hard to eat lots of healthy meals and track everything using my fitbit to help me get in better shape. This was one of my healthy breakfasts, and had cottage cheese, topped with mixed berries and mixed nuts. Some of the berries are sea buckthorn (called havtorn here), which are the little bright orange ones you can see in the middle. Their flavour is pretty sour, which I love but isn’t for everyone, but they are often used to make juices or jam. 
870 down, 926 to go

870. Sea Buckthorn

Since Christmas, I’ve been trying hard to eat lots of healthy meals and track everything using my fitbit to help me get in better shape. This was one of my healthy breakfasts, and had cottage cheese, topped with mixed berries and mixed nuts. Some of the berries are sea buckthorn (called havtorn here), which are the little bright orange ones you can see in the middle. Their flavour is pretty sour, which I love but isn’t for everyone, but they are often used to make juices or jam. 

870 down, 926 to go

A little before Christmas, I was kindly invited to go along to Pie’s company Julbord,  which is the Swedish Christmas dinner. It was a buffet of so many delicious things it was hard to try everything I wanted to (although as you can see from my plates I certainly tried hard!). The first plate was full of lots of cooked meats - including 868. Reindeer, gravadlax, salads, and traditional Christmas ham. The second featured all the hot foods, from meatballs to small sausages called prinskorv, to all kinds of gratinated vegetables. My last plate was dessert, and had all kinds of mini cakes, plus Swedish candies. The whole thing was washed down with a julöl (Christmas ale), and several servings of 869. Snaps which is something altogether different, and a hell of a lot nicer,  than the schnapps I am used to getting in England (i.e. it is strong and slightly aniseedy, rather than sickly and peach-flavoured). The restaurant was right at the top of a radio tower, so the top picture is the view from our table. Altogether an awesome experience. 
869 down, 927 to go

A little before Christmas, I was kindly invited to go along to Pie’s company Julbord,  which is the Swedish Christmas dinner. It was a buffet of so many delicious things it was hard to try everything I wanted to (although as you can see from my plates I certainly tried hard!). The first plate was full of lots of cooked meats - including 868. Reindeer, gravadlax, salads, and traditional Christmas ham. The second featured all the hot foods, from meatballs to small sausages called prinskorv, to all kinds of gratinated vegetables. My last plate was dessert, and had all kinds of mini cakes, plus Swedish candies. The whole thing was washed down with a julöl (Christmas ale), and several servings of 869. Snaps which is something altogether different, and a hell of a lot nicer,  than the schnapps I am used to getting in England (i.e. it is strong and slightly aniseedy, rather than sickly and peach-flavoured). The restaurant was right at the top of a radio tower, so the top picture is the view from our table. Altogether an awesome experience. 

869 down, 927 to go

867. Jump-in-the-Pan Chicken
It’s not very often I make something which is an Australian recipe - it’s not really a cuisine I even think about very often to be honest - but I was very glad I made this recipe. It involves bashing out chicken breasts until they are very thin and you can easily shred the meat into small pieces with your fingers. Then you fry the tiny chicken pieces with butter, lemon, white wine, capers and parsley, and rather than stirring, you mix it by flipping the pan slightly, making the chicken ‘jump in the pan’. It was quick and easy, and was lovely served with just rice and green veggies. 
867 down, 929 to go

867. Jump-in-the-Pan Chicken

It’s not very often I make something which is an Australian recipe - it’s not really a cuisine I even think about very often to be honest - but I was very glad I made this recipe. It involves bashing out chicken breasts until they are very thin and you can easily shred the meat into small pieces with your fingers. Then you fry the tiny chicken pieces with butter, lemon, white wine, capers and parsley, and rather than stirring, you mix it by flipping the pan slightly, making the chicken ‘jump in the pan’. It was quick and easy, and was lovely served with just rice and green veggies. 

867 down, 929 to go

866. Ants Climbing Trees
This is a really simple dish to make, that tastes like it’s much more complicated than it is. The dish is literally ground pork, fried with some soy sauce, sesame oil and a little chilli sauce, mixed with bean thread noodles. I think the name comes from the look of the pork clinging to the noodles.
866 down, 930 to go

866. Ants Climbing Trees

This is a really simple dish to make, that tastes like it’s much more complicated than it is. The dish is literally ground pork, fried with some soy sauce, sesame oil and a little chilli sauce, mixed with bean thread noodles. I think the name comes from the look of the pork clinging to the noodles.

866 down, 930 to go

865. Bath Olivers
Bath Olivers are a traditional British cracker. They are perfectly acceptable, if a little dull compared to most other crackers you can get, but for some reason they are inexplicably expensive. I’m not quite sure how anyone can justify charging £3 or so for basically flour and water baked together; maybe they are made by special fairies, or have ground up diamonds in them. In any case, they taste like nothing, don’t bother.
865 down, 931 to go

865. Bath Olivers

Bath Olivers are a traditional British cracker. They are perfectly acceptable, if a little dull compared to most other crackers you can get, but for some reason they are inexplicably expensive. I’m not quite sure how anyone can justify charging £3 or so for basically flour and water baked together; maybe they are made by special fairies, or have ground up diamonds in them. In any case, they taste like nothing, don’t bother.

865 down, 931 to go